Museum Blog

Articles in category Zoology: 46

  • Leaving for Churchill, Manitoba on Hudson Bay October 20 for 4 days of polar bears.  Hopefully we'll see some other wildlife like arctic hares and foxes.  I'll post pics when I get back.
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  • 2012 has brought two pivotal decisions for the publication of newly discovered species. Before, everything relevant to scientific names (nomenclature) had to be published on hard copy. From this year, species discoveries can be published in online journals. Electronic works containing new anima…
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  • Shrews in the News

    Posted 07/02/2012 by John Demboski | Comments
    The USGS issued a press release around our new shrew paper published in Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution.   Here's the link to the release: "Shrews in the News - Rapid Evolution of Shrews in Response to Climate Change"   and here: "Shrews Rapidly Evolving in Re…
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  • Was out this past week and a half with students in the Bridger (Green River) Basin of southwestern Wyoming. Highschool Teen Science Scholars, undergraduate students, other scientists, DMNS volunteers, and a few dogs.  The Green River Basin is a treasure trove of Eocene critters that lived…
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  • The redhead duck egg clutch we saw in the last installment of "The Egg Craters" is shown above.  Zoology department volunteer Alika Brooks designed and fabricated this hand-made "egg crate" to properly house the 36 eggs in this set. The box is made from acid-free cardboard and the eggs …
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  • The Egg Craters!

    Posted 05/17/2012 by John Demboski | Comments
    For nearly a century or more, most of the egg sets in the Zoology Department have been stored in open topped, single-walled, cardboard boxes. They were like fragile little sardines, clacking against one another; not the safest way to store eggs. The only difference is that unlike sardines, egg…
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  • POLAR BEAR WATCH In mid-October, some hundreds of polar bears begin arriving in Churchill, Manitoba, the polar bear capital of the world. The bears are waiting for the ice to come to Hudson Bay so they can hunt for their primary food source, seals. Normally these bears are solitary, but th…
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  • Over 56,000 DMNS vertebrate records now online and searchable through the multi-institutional, web-accessible database Arctos. Click on the bison or kiwi to search the collections!  We are constantly updating the records to include more accurate geographic information,…
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  • Off to the Snake River Plain in southern Idaho next week to collect specimens of Tamias amoenus cratericus for genetic work. This is a subspecies of yellow-pine chipmunk that is found in and around Craters of the Moon National Monument.  Over the last decade, we've discovered that its ge…
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