Museum Blog

Articles for author Frank Krell: 35

  • On Thursday, September 18, a new era for the DMNS entomology collection began. The collection started to move from the old space below IMAX into our brand new, state-of-the-art Rocky Mountain Science Collections Center two levels below ground. On Monday, all dry collections were moved and secured in…
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  • The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a continental-scale observatory that measures the causes and effects of climate change, land use change and invasive species on U.S. ecosystems. They do extensive pitfall trapping on observatory sites all over the continent. Although focused on s…
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  • On behalf of the Denver Museum of Nature & Science, David Bettman, Chris Grinter, and Frank Krell, we are pleased to invite you to the 25th Annual Meeting of the High Country Lepidopterists on November 7 and 8. The meeting will be held in the Ludlow-Griffith Zoology Workshop of our brand new Roc…
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  • Summer can be a quiet time in the Zoology Department. It is the main fieldwork season with staff making discoveries outside, traveling, or even enjoying a bit of vacation. This summer we reached another milestone in our efforts to make our collections better available to the scientific community and…
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  • Digging Snowmastodon has not only uncovered an immense number of bones, teeth, and wood, but also less conspicuous fossils, such as fragments of insects, amongst them...dung beetles. What else could we expect? Mammoth, mastodon, ground sloth, camel, and many other large and small mammals populated t…
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  • John Witt Randall (1813–1892), great-grandson of Samuel Adams, the American revolutionary patriot, was an art collector (Rembrandt, Dürer, etc.) and poet who in his early years published a few zoological papers in which he described numerous new species of beetles and crustaceans from the United Sta…
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  • When we were out collecting dung beetles from bison dung at the Plains Conservation Center a week ago, by far the most numerous beetles were the red "Europeans". The red-winged Aphodius dung beetle, believed to be an invasive from Europe and having been brought over by the first settlers on their di…
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  • The Journal Impact Factor, calculated and published annually by Thomson Reuters, is the most influential metric in academic publishing. It is widely used to judge the performance of scientific journals and is still widely misapplied to assess individual scientists. Journal editors and publishers tho…
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  • Today we passed the mark of 25,000 databased insect specimens, thanks to our wonderful, efficient and indefatigable volunteers and our grant-funded assistants, David Bettman and Chris Grinter. Supported by two grants of the National Science Foundation, we are transferring label data of scientific sp…
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  • For many years, DMNS Research Associate David Steinmann has explored Colorado caves and collected invertebrates that nobody has ever seen before. In October 2012, in Bonnie's Hall Cave in Eagle County in Colorado, he came across a small, 14 mm long millipede of the genus Austrotyla. This genus conta…
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