Indigenous Film

The Denver Museum of Nature & Science is pleased to partner with the International Institute for Indigenous Resource Management and the Denver American Indian Commission to present Indigenous Film, a monthly indigenous film series.

Films will be screened at the Museum’s Phipps IMAX Theater. Doors open at 6 p.m., films begin at 6:30 p.m. Please use the IMAX Evening entrance on the east side of the Museum.

Admission is free. Concessions will be available for purchase.

April 12
6:30 p.m.

Our Children, Our Future: A program in recognition of Child Abuse Prevention Month

Le Lac Abitibi (Lake Abitibi) Algonquin director Melanie Kistabish traces the history of Lake Abitibi, a traditional gathering place for her people, now abandoned. Her search for a forgotten past reveals the efforts of political and religious authorities to “civilize” the Algonquin and other First Nations peoples of Canada, and the resulting disruption to their traditional lifeways, culture and identity. (Wapikoni Mobile, 2006, 15 min.)

The Amendment In this experimental documentary Director Kevin Papatie (Algonquin) explores the boarding school experience and its impact on language in the northern Quebec First Nations community of Kitcisakik. (Wapikoni Mobile, 2007, 4 min.).

The Salt Song Trail: A Living Documentary The sacred Salt Songs of the Nuwuvi (Southern Paiute) people describe ancient landscapes of the People since Ocean Woman and Coyote set the world into motion at the beginning of time. Most often sung at funerals and memorials to assist the deceased on their journey to the next world, this documentary chronicles a gathering and sing at the Stewart Indian Boarding School in 2006. Edited by Bridget Sandate (Chemehuevi). (The Cultural Conservancy, Salt Song Trail Project and Chemehuevi Cultural Center, 2009, 14 min.)

In The Rubbish Tin, directed by Riwia Brown (Ngāti Porou, Te Whānau-ā-Apanui). Abandoned on her birth-day, Pippa escapes into an imaginary world with her best friend Chubby. (Blueskin Films Ltd., 2014, 4 min.).

The Weight, directed by Craig Commanda, Algonquin from Kitigan Zibi (2014, 4 min.), and Lost, directed by Allison Coon-Come, Cree from Mistissini (2010, 3 min.). Two short films from Wapikoni Mobile present youth perspectives on struggling with depression and sadness.

Ways of Yesterday, director Elliott M. Simon (Wikwemikong). Through rap and break dance, two young men, Elliott and Curtis, send a message to kids to connect to their traditions and follow a positive path to their dreams for the future. (Wapikoni Mobile, 2014, 6 min.).

Following the films, Elicia Goodsoldier will present a talk on understanding historical trauma and lead audience Q&A.

2017 Schedule– Film titles to be announced
May 10
June 14 (Screening will take place in Ricketson Auditorium)
July 12 (Screening will take place in Ricketson Auditorium)
August 9
September 13
October 8 (Screening will take place in Ricketson Auditorium)
November 8
No screening in December

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